An Optimistic Approach

My role as the Director of Physical Wellness for InMotion has been inspired by a combination of 20 years working in the fitness industry ( the last seven of which were spent in the trenches working with the Parkinson’s community), and by my time as an Ambassador for the Michael J. Fox Foundation with the Partners in Parkinson’s movement.

The focus of my blog will be to offer you an optimistic approach to living with Parkinson’s Disease (PD.)  There was a time when PD was life threatening, but not anymore.  ...

The Other Side of the Fence

Parkinson’s disease … diagnosis, symptoms, medicines … standard fare and easy to talk about. But for me and I suspect many others, there is much more to the story. Each of us has our own burdens when it comes to this disease … secrets, worry, loneliness. I now admit that this is a disease that I have had to get my head wrapped around … perhaps you have had as well. ...

A New Definition of Parkinson’s Disease

Although the issue has not gained many headlines, a great deal of energy is being expended by movement disorders neurologists to develop a new way of thinking about Parkinson’s disease. This effort has been prompted by two major trends: a growing recognition that traditional definitions are inadequate, and an assortment of new scientific discoveries that compel us to broaden our understanding of what exactly constitutes Parkinson’s disease.

To neurologists, the classic definition of Parkinson’s disease in patients consists of a combination of clinical (i.e., symptoms and physical examination findings) abnormalities: tremor, muscle rigidity, a characteristic impairment of voluntary movement (reduced in speed, size and quantity), and posture and balance problems. ...

New Center Brings Hope

Delighted to share this terrific story (Today’s Family Magazine, April 29, 2015) on InMotion’s evolution and the hope we afford people with Parkinsons.

“A 67-year-old retired registered nurse with an extensive background in research, Maria suddenly found herself in the role of patient, with the haunting three words “incurable, progressive, and debilitating” looming over a future she had envisioned with her husband, Gene, their family, and grandchildren. 

“Those are big words,” Maria said. ...