InMotion Research Presented at WPC Shows Value of Physical Activity for PD Clients.

At the 4th World Parkinson Congress held in Portland, Oregon September 20-23, 2016, a group of researchers affiliated with InMotion presented a poster entitled “Early Results on Preservation of Motor Performance in a Community-Based Exercise Program”. The poster text detailed the results of a study of 28 volunteers with Parkinson’s disease attending physical activity programs (dance, exercise, sports, tai chi, yoga) at InMotion. Each person was individually assessed on the basis of a number of tests of physical performance at the beginning of their attendance at InMotion, and after 6 months of participation. ...

Physical Activity and Parkinson’s Disease

It is common knowledge that the brain directs physical activity. For example, most people know that paralysis from a stroke is due to damage to the brain. It is only in recent years, however, that scientific investigators have begun to appreciate the other direction of this relationship, namely the role of physical activity in promoting brain health. This recognition has turned out to have enormous implications for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. ...

Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease

The idea that Parkinson’s disease involves more than its classic motor symptoms (tremor, slowness, shuffling, etc.) is not new. Even James Parkinson recognized this in his seminal publication describing this disease in 1817. However, it is only in the last 25 years or so that neurologists have taken a serious, in-depth look at the nonmotor manifestations of Parkinson’s disease. What they have found has evolved into a rich field of study that has both permitted a greater understanding, and revealed greater levels of complexity, of Parkinson’s disease than previously known. ...

A New Definition of Parkinson’s Disease

Although the issue has not gained many headlines, a great deal of energy is being expended by movement disorders neurologists to develop a new way of thinking about Parkinson’s disease. This effort has been prompted by two major trends: a growing recognition that traditional definitions are inadequate, and an assortment of new scientific discoveries that compel us to broaden our understanding of what exactly constitutes Parkinson’s disease.

To neurologists, the classic definition of Parkinson’s disease in patients consists of a combination of clinical (i.e., symptoms and physical examination findings) abnormalities: tremor, muscle rigidity, a characteristic impairment of voluntary movement (reduced in speed, size and quantity), and posture and balance problems. ...